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Spine shape research sheds a great deal of light and understanding upon discussions of how to sit at a computer and how best to configure a computer workstation. Wolff's Law (see Blog #3) demands that we sit correctly in order to avoid deformity and the complaints the precede it. Please study the above pictures to see if you can guess where these workers hurt? The men moan about chronic low back pain and the woman complains of upper back and neck pain. Their complaints are related to the mechanical factors of their work tasks and the discomfort is both avoidable...

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Living tissue changes shape according to forces applied to it. This "as the twig is bent, so grows the tree" principle is known as Wolff's Law. Bone cells degenerate ahead of an applied force and new bone cells develop behind that force, resulting in altered bone shape. It's how orthodontists pull teeth into new positions, but it's not a comfortable experience. Somebody should have told this guy his job comes with occupational hazards, including a bent spine and several orthopedic consequences...unless he chooses to fight back.   Wolff's Law is always present, at any age. That's why we sometimes see...

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             "My headaches begin at the base of my skull and travel up both sides of the back of my head."  Evan is a programmer who works long hours at his computer. His chair is an "ergonomic" chair but doesn't seem to fit right. His desk is a "sit-stand" desk but he's unsure how tall it should be for sitting or standing. His monitor is large but not adjustable and feels too low, so he adjusts the desk higher or angles the monitor upward in an attempt to raise it. Adjusting the desk higher helps the neck...

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Sid is a machinist. He works at a lathe in a large shop by day and works in his own shop many evenings. He experiences routine back and neck pains but attributes them to years of hard work and advancing age. A recent MRI found nothing remarkable. He loves his work but is considering retiring because he can hardly get out of bed each morning. He assumes the early morning stiffness is his back's way of telling him it's time to quit working so hard. Spine shape assessment revealed Sid's spine is falling forward nine degrees and that he's losing the...

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  What we all call muscles are actually bundles of thousands of muscle fibers. When we pick up our keys, we use only a small number of these fibers because that's all the job requires. When we lift a gallon of milk, we use many more fibers because it weighs eight pounds. But when we help lift something heavy like a piano, we recruit as many fibers as we possibly can. What's amazing about our muscle fibers is that they know how to take turns doing the lifting. This allows tired fibers to rest and recover while their neighbors take over....

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